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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
, but then we all remember the damage that hurricane katrina did to president bush. >> john we heard bill plante report that president obama cancelled that event this morning in orlando, florida, but bill clinton picked up the slack and held that rally now. now we know that bill clinton will be in seven states in the coming week. how much is that a help to the obama team? >> well, without putting too fine a point on it you can imagine the situation in which that helps quite a lot. bill clinton having received better reviews at the democratic convention than the sitting president. bill clinton is hugely popular in the democratic base. so getting those crowds out is important because in the states they take them from the events to the polling places and you grab them and you say, come knock on doors with me this weekend. spend more time volunteering to get these votes out. so it's important that the gathering function of these events continue to happen. and with bill clinton being a big draw he's the best surrogate barack obama could have in these crucial states. >>
that already have post true mat yuck stress from katrina, 9/11, this brings it back some is driven by the media but also politicians that want people to be fearful so they get out of the way and save lives. >> of course. you know you don't want to underpredict and you don't want to overpredict. so they are trying to get that just right. >> what can you do? >> you should watch a show like this where the attitude is measured and nothing is hyped. but when you hear somebody talking like this, there is a storm, doesn't matter what they say. if they are talking like this your adrenaline is up. i saw on the upper west side, there were people coming out of a meat store carrying what looked like half a cow. it is like a mob mentality. i think probably like -- box of cereal and a quart of milk will get you through a couple of day. >> right. >> live on the upper west side. i was many cancerying meat but one of the people that went to the store. why am i here? >> because everybody else is here. there are lines. there is a line. >> i better go get something. what do we do
the army corps of engineers to help. the same group brought in to new orleans after hurricane katrina. >> we expect it to be a challenging engineering problem, and getting that all storm surge back out and up and running again, will take some time and engineering talent and a lot of willpower. >> reporter: they'll also need electric power, something 323,000 customers in new york city are still without. workers are pumping around the clock to remove sea water from underground equipment. but dark skylines and dangerous intersections will be the new normal in lower manhattan and some parts of the outer boroughs for a while longer. utility companies say it might be a week before power is fully restored. city buses here in new york resume full service today to get the city going again. there will be fare-free rides. no charge. also today we saw for the first time ferry service from new jersey resuming. back to you. >> and there is much more than water damage in new york city. there was a devastating fire on the rockaway peninsula where much of a neighborhood burned down early tuesday morni
it the second most expensive storm in u.s. history, after hurricane katrina. >> nearly half of new york city's death from superstorm sandy happened on staten island. homeland secretary janet napolitano is going there today, where people say they're suffering and not getting enough help. anna werner, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. as you stand on this street in staten island you can clearly see the path of destruction wrought by hurricane sandy. cars picked up and tossed like toys. that continues throughout the neighborho neighborhood. many residents say they feel ignored. some residents of staten island have started calling it the forgotten burrough. across storm-ravaged staten island, frustrations are mounting. >> we're going to die! we're going to freeze! we've got 90-year-old people. >> reporter: residents are outraged, claiming their community has been ignored in the days following sandy while aid pours in to other parts of new york and new jersey. >> they don't talk about them that much. a lot of people here are hurting much it's upsetting. >> reporter: power is out. hundreds
to the economy. that makes it the second most expensive storm in history after hurricane katrina. >> nearly half of new york city's deaths happened on staten island. secretary of state janet napolitano will be there today. anna werner is there. >> reporter: good morning. homes are destroyed. the storm threw cars like toys. that's what it looks like all down this street yet many residents say they believe they've been ignored. some residents of staten island have started calling it the forgotten borough. across storm-ravaged staten island, frustrations are mounting. >> we could have died! we couldn't breathe! we've got 90-year-old people. >> reporter: residents are outraged, claiming their community has been ignored in the days following sandy while aid pours into other parts of new york and new jersey. >> a lot of people are here. a lot of people are hurting. so, it's upsetting. >> reporter: power is out. hundreds of homes have been destroyed and dozens of streets are impassable. still, the city is planning to go ahead with its annual marathon, which kicks off on staten island's verrazano bridge
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)